Reliability of Physical Signals

I think it is very interesting that Collins made a counterpoint on Murray's point that Frediani was visibly shaken when told that his prints were identified on the teapot-- his shoulders sank and his face became flushed. That is also when he made the statement about being drunk during the act. But Collins reacts by saying that most people who are interviewed in a police station are physically altered or affected, and their physical features can give away their nervousness. So people are not always calm or collected, even when innocent.

This idea reminded me of our discussion of lie detector tests and their reliability. If lie detectors measure heart rate, isn't it possible that someone who is nervous in general can give a false positive? Maybe someone had a lot of caffeine or is excited about something, or maybe they are simply nervous about being given a lie detector test or being in that setting.This question of the reliability of physical signals also affects court hearings themselves. It is possible that a sorrowful looking or unremorseful-looking person can subconsciously affect the way a just makes their ruling. The physical aspects of a defendant can also affect the physical aspects of the jury, for better or for worse, and truly or artificially.
Reliability of Physical Signals

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